Big Etna Furnace

Also called 'Alice', 'Blanche', and 'Marting, Iron, and Steel'

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Screenshot 2020-05-29 at 6.40.19 PM
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Built-in 1873 by the Etna Iron Works. The furnaces were reported to be located just above the city of Ironton on the river bank. Big Etna was built with the Blanche Furnace, also known as the Alice Furnace, Blanche Furnace, and Marting, Iron, and Steel. The furnaces were also known as the Ferrie Patent Self Coking Furnaces. Together they had a capacity of 75 tons using HRIR iron, and 100 tons when using Lake Superior ore. This fact clearly shows the impact of the Lake Superior ore on the HRIR region - the superior yield of the northern ore would eventually be a factor in the demise of the HRIR industry. Blanche Furnace was named for Blanche McGovney, who married Charles S. Gray, son of Col. George Noah Gray.

Etna Iron Works

The company that once owned the furnace.

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The Etna Iron Works was a 19th-century ironworks and manufacturing plant for marine steam engines located in New York City. The Etna Works was a failing small business when purchased by iron molder John Roach and three partners in 1852.